Last edited by Meztilrajas
Friday, August 7, 2020 | History

8 edition of Water balance in land arthropods found in the catalog.

Water balance in land arthropods

E. B. Edney

Water balance in land arthropods

by E. B. Edney

  • 197 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Springer-Verlag in Berlin, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Arthropoda -- Physiology,
  • Osmoregulation

  • Edition Notes

    StatementE. B. Edney.
    SeriesZoophysiology and ecology ;, v. 9
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL434.72 .E35
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 282 p. :
    Number of Pages282
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4534695M
    ISBN 100387080848
    LC Control Number77000424

    This book surveys the ways in which land dwelling arthropods deal with water in terrestrial environments. From scorpion to beetle and spider to hover fly, water is a crucial component of activity. This new synthesis and integration of recent research summarizes the ways water is managed by these diverse terrestrial invertebrates. Many water balance attributes of the off-host phase of the blood feeder’s life cycle are common to all terrestrial arthropods, and excellent earlier reviews by Edney (), Wharton () and Hadley () provide good summaries of the basic principles of water balance that are germane to .

    Excretory structure that works with the gut in reducing water loss in land arthropods. book lung. Respiratory structure found in many arachnids. spinneret. Organ in a spider's abdomen that spins silk into fibers. carapace. Hard shield reinforced with calcium carbonate that covers the . Mention the words 'arthropod cuticle' to most biologists and they usually provoke a glazed expression. This is because the cuticle is commonly regarded as an inert substance. It is hoped that this book will dispel this fallacy. The study of cuticle in its proper context now involves many of the.

    these tubules also help terrestrial arthropods preserve water in their bodies so as to maintain homeostatic water balance. spiracles. these are openings that give evidence for how both the trachea and how the book lungs open to the outside of the body of the arthropod.   Species of Arthropoda have found their way into almost every habitat on Earth. They are hugely abundant in both water and on land although most living arthropods are primarily found on land. Insects are the most abundant group of animals on land-based environments and are also common in many freshwater ecosystems.


Share this book
You might also like
One little monster

One little monster

Germanys new Right as culture and politics

Germanys new Right as culture and politics

Something human.

Something human.

Teachers And Educational Quality

Teachers And Educational Quality

Statewide industrial development, credit corporations, and State development authorities

Statewide industrial development, credit corporations, and State development authorities

EMI control methodology and procedures.

EMI control methodology and procedures.

Final report of the Symposium on Rehabilitating the Ethiopian Economy

Final report of the Symposium on Rehabilitating the Ethiopian Economy

Arts of a vanished era.

Arts of a vanished era.

The manufacturing sector in Zimbabwe

The manufacturing sector in Zimbabwe

NAEP arts

NAEP arts

The life and strange surprizing adventures of Robinson Crusoe of York, mariner

The life and strange surprizing adventures of Robinson Crusoe of York, mariner

Saint Bonaventures Disputed Questions on the Mystery of the Trinity

Saint Bonaventures Disputed Questions on the Mystery of the Trinity

Eating LIFE cereal with a bigger spoon than most

Eating LIFE cereal with a bigger spoon than most

Water balance in land arthropods by E. B. Edney Download PDF EPUB FB2

Writers on arthropod water relationships range from bio­ physicists and biochemists to population ecologists-a fact that gives cause to wonder whether the field is already too heterogeneous to be written about in a single book by a single author.

Writers on arthropod water relationships range from bio­ physicists and biochemists to population ecologists-a fact that gives cause to wonder whether the field is already too heterogeneous to be written about in a single book by a single author. I have partly avoided the problem by concentrating Book Title Water Balance in Land Arthropods.

Water balance in land arthropods. Author(s): Book: Zoophysiology and Ecology Vol.9 + pp. Abstract: The author reviews reviews Subject Category: Publications see more details work on the gain and loss of water by terrestrial arthropods arthropods Cited by: Arthropod, any member of the phylum Arthropoda, the largest phylum in the animal kingdom, which includes such familiar forms as lobsters, crabs, spiders, mites, insects, centipedes, and millipedes.

About 84 percent of all known species of animals are members of this phylum. Arthropods are represented in every habitat on Earth and show a great variety of adaptations.

Edney, E.Water balance in land arthropods / E. Edney Springer-Verlag Berlin ; New York Wikipedia Citation Please see Wikipedia's template documentation for further. Water Balance in Land Arthropods. By E. Edney. xii+ (Springer: Berlin, Heidelberg and New York, ) DM78; $ Arthropod - Arthropod - Excretory system and water balance: Crustaceans and arachnids possess paired excretory organs (maxillary, antennal, or coxal glands) that open at the bases of certain appendages.

Myriapods, insects, and some arachnids, such as spiders and mites, possess another type of excretory organ, Malpighian tubules, which open into the intestine.

Cite this chapter as: Edney E.B. () Excretion and Osmoregulation. In: Water Balance in Land Arthropods. Zoophysiology and Ecology, vol 9. Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library. Arthropods are the largest phylum in the animal kingdom.

Most arthropods are insects. The phylum also includes spiders, centipedes, and crustaceans. The arthropod body consists of three segments with a hard exoskeleton and jointed appendages.

Terrestrial arthropods have adaptations for life on land, such as trachea or book lungs for breathing air. As judged by the number of species, or of individuals, arthropods are an extremely successful group of desert inhabitants.

There is very great structural and physiological diversity within the group, and since adaptations to desert life open to one are not open to all.

we should not expect to find the maximum possible development of adaptive features in any arthropod simply because it lives in. adshelp[at] The ADS is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory under NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX16AC86A. Book-lungs. Pseudotracheae or air tubes. Anal respiration.

Miscellaneous devices. Trachea: This is the most important organ for aerial respiration. This chitin-lined tube is seen in almost all land arthropods, such as insects, centipedes, millipedes and many arachnids.

Two types of. Life Takes to the Land. We see arthropods everywhere we go. Arthropoda, the third protostome phylum, is everywhere. Arthropods live on the land and in the sea. They swim, run, and fly.

Arthropods mean a lot to us, too. We eat them, get sick from them, and chase them with flyswatters and bug spray. Gills: Just as book lungs allow for terrestrial respiration, gills allow for aquatic arthropods use their gills to take in water and absorb its oxygen into their bloodstream.

Cement Glands: Cement glands are unique adaptations that allow barnacles to adhere to nearly any adhesive secreted helps barnacles cling to rocks, ships, and other organisms. Water balance of the terrestrial isopod, Armadillidium vulgare, was investigated during conglobation (rolling-up behavior).

Water loss and metabolic rates were measured at 18 ± 1°C in dry air using flow-through respirometry. Water-loss rates decreased % when specimens were in their conglobated form, while CO2 release decreased by %. Edney: Water Balance in Land Arthropods.

– pages, figs., 36 tables. XII, (Zoophysiology and Ecology Vol. Cloth DM 78,–; US $. impermeable to water b. improved excretory system for salt and water balance conserve water by getting rid of N wastes as urea or uric acid rather than as ammonia (most aquatic animals) Animals: Arthropods-Chelicerates Ziser Lecture Notes, 2 c.

respiratory system to extract oxygen directly from air instead of water. : Water Balance in Land Arthropods (Zoophysiology) (): E. Edney: BooksCited by: Water Balance in Land Arthropods by E. Edney. Paperback (Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. ) $ -a fact that gives cause to wonder whether the field is already too heterogeneous to be written about in a single book by a single author.

I have partly avoided the problem by concentrating largely on physiological. Edney, EB () Water Balance in Land Arthropods. Berlin: Springer-Verlag, pp. Egnér, H, Riehm, H and Domingo, WR () Untersuchungen uber die chemische Bodenanalyse als Grundlage fur die Beurteilung des Nährstoffzustandes der Böden.Additional Physical Format: Online version: Edney, E.B.

Water balance in land arthropods. Berlin ; New York: Springer-Verlag, (OCoLC)Get this from a library! Water Balance in Land Arthropods. [Eric B Edney] -- Writers on arthropod water relationships range from bio­ physicists and biochemists to population ecologists-a fact that gives cause to wonder whether the field is already too heterogeneous to be.